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Amjad Aref

Amjad Aref Photo

Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

235 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2423

 

webpage: http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~aaref/

Research Interests:

Structural Engineering; Computational Mechanics; Composite Materials Mechanics and Applications; Earthquake Engineering; Blast Engineering and Multiphysics Problems

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Aref teaches and conducts research in the general area of structural engineering, mechanics, and computations. One major area of research is the applications of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bridges. He has successfully completed three projects related to FRP bridges in NY State and the findings of his work have made their way to practical solutions. Dr. Aref is also involved with various research initiatives in the areas of seismic design and evaluation, computational mechanics and blast engineering.

Fiber reinforced polymer bridge deck on steel girders

Fiber reinforced polymer bridge deck on steel girders

Robert E. Baier

Robert E. Baier Photo

Professor

Industry/University Center for Biosurfaces

University at Buffalo

110 Parker Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3560

 

Professor

Oral Diagnostic Sciences

University at Buffalo

110 Parker Hall

Buffalo, NY 14215

 

webpage: http://wings.buffalo.edu/faculty/research/iucb

Research Interests:

Air quality; Public health; Bioaerosols; Nosocomial infection control; Biohazards; Photocatalysis

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Maintenance or rapid restoration of healthful indoor air quality is critical to the continuing welfare and performance of building occupants and infrastructure, especially when challenged by hazardous excursions of outdoor air quality that may be associated with combustion-spawned or deliberate threat pollutants. New York Office of Science, Technology and Academic Research (NYSTAR) has equipped Buffalo’s Center for Biosurfaces and Environmental Quality System Center partners across NY State to reliably monitor and detect respirable particulate and other air quality indicators associated with emissions from sources as diverse as diesel-operated vehicles and dental clinic operations. Practical means to combat and control risk factors in both public health and hospitality industry settings are being introduced and independently assessed by cooperative industry/university research teams. Air quality control mechanisms based on photocatalytic disinfection via UV-A-illuminated titanium dioxide particles show promising test results in pilot-scale studies utilizing a unique 600 m3 atmospheric test chamber.

Rajan Batta

Rajan Batta Photo

Professor

Industrial and Systems Engineering

University at Buffalo

410 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2357 ext 2110

 

webpage: http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~batta/

Research Interests:

Airport Security System Design; Security Risk Modeling for Trucks Transporting Hazardous Materials; Management of Casualty Queues in a Disaster Setting; Management of Critical Resources in a Disaster Setting

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

A current project related to extreme events relates to modeling of security risk for a truck carrying hazardous materials. Network security is examined by evaluating and limiting the available links to HazMat routing based on risk measurements described and by devising routes that seek to mitigate any consequence and dissuade attacks. Given a road network, the Hazardous-Network Design Problem (HDP) selects links that should be closed to HazMat transportation in order to minimize total risk. The formulation of the HDP is bi-level, containing an outer and inner problem that mimics the interaction between policy makers and HazMat carriers.

Ling Bian

Ling Bian Photo

Professor

Geography

University at Buffalo

105 Wilkeson Quad

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-2722

 

webpage: http://www.geog.buffalo.edu/~lbian/

Research Interests:

Individual-based spatially explicit epidemiological modeling; Interoperable environmental models; Geographic image retreival

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The spread of communicable diseases, such as SARS, anthrax, and Ebola, through a population is an intrinsic spatial and temporal process. This project uses an individual-based and spatially explicit framework for modeling the dispersion of communicable diseases in communities. This framework allows the representation of discrete individuals, individualized interactions, and interaction patterns in a network of human contact. The explicit representation of the spatial location and mobility of individuals in particular facilitates the modeling of spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the disease transmission. This approach helps identify those communities that are vulnerable to the spread of some of the most dangerous communicable diseases in potential events of bio-terror threats. The figure below illustrates differences in spatial dispersion of diseases based on demographic, socio-economic, and employment structures of communities.

Ann Bisantz

Ann Bisantz Photo

Associate Professor

Industrial and Systems Engineering

University at Buffalo

438 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2357 ext 2474

 

webpage: http://www.ise.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Human factors; Cognitive engineering; Human-decision making; Information displays

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Bisantz research involves support of expert performance in complex human-technology systems, through models of decision-making demands, task information, and decision making strategies. For instance, we have studied the role of visual, auditory, and tactile representations of information uncertainty and pedigree to support decision making in geo-spatial tasks. Other work has involved applying cognitive engineering techniques to an emergency operations system in order to develop useful information sources for incident personnel. A work domain analysis of an emergency management environment (in a post-earthquake context) was performed, and linked abstraction hierarchy models representing the emergency management and response system, the physical environment (e.g., buildings, transportation systems, civilians), and other goal directed agents (e.g., civilian responders and volunteers) were created. Outputs from that analysis (information requirements) were input to the design of the information processing algorithms, providing guidance as to the nature of information required by decision makers, which could be computed through fusion capabilities. This work presents an example of an integrated cognitive engineering/multisensor fusion methodology.

Frank V. Bright

Frank V. Bright Photo

SUNY Distinguished Professor, A. Conger Goodyear Chair

Chemistry

University at Buffalo

511 Natural Sciences Complex

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-68xx ext 2161

 

webpage: http://www.chem.buffalo.edu/bright.php

Research Interests:

Chemical sensors; Environmentally benign chemistry; Biomaterials for wound repair

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Bright’s research focuses on: (i) the development of robust solid-state chemical sensors for the detection and quantification of volatile gases, drugs, steroids and prostaglandins, and proteins in complex milieu; (ii) understanding solvation and chemical reactivity in supercritical fluids and ionic liquids; and (iii) the development of biodegradable constructs for controlled delivery of protein-based drugs for wound repair. The graphic illustrates the interior of a molecularly tailored xerogel-based nanopore that is used for chemical sensing applications.

Michel Bruneau

Michel Bruneau Photo

Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

130 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-3398

 

webpage: http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~bruneau

Research Interests:

Structural engineering; Earthquake-resistant design; Blast engineering; Multi-hazard design; Dynamic response of structures; Seismic evaluation and retrofit of bridges and buildings; Ultimate behavior of steel, metal, and advanced composite structures

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Bruneau has conducted extensive research on the seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing bridges and buildings subjected to large destructive forces up to collapse. This research has encompassed the development and large-scale experimental validation of various metallic energy-dissipating design concepts to enhance the resilience of structures against extreme events. This work has contributed to the adoption of special design requirements for ductile steel walls, ductile bridge diaphragms, tubular eccentrically braced frames, structural fuses, and controlled-rocking piers. Recent focus has been on the development of multi-hazard resistant design concepts capable of simultaneously providing an adequate level of protection against collapse under both seismic and blast loading. Dr. Bruneau has conducted numerous reconnaissance visits to disaster stricken areas, and is a member of many professional and technical code-writing committees. He served as MCEER Director from 2003-2008, and Deputy Director from 1998-2003.

Blast test of multi-hazard resistant bridge pier (tested specimen is engulfed into fire-ball from explosion)

Blast test of multi-hazard resistant bridge pier (tested specimen is engulfed into fire-ball from explosion)

Lisa Butler

Lisa Butler Photo

Associate Professor

Social Work

University at Buffalo

229 Parker Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3991 ext 141

 

Buffalo Center for Social Research

 

Research Interests:

Traumatic stress; Resilience; Postraumatic growth; Anticipatory trauma

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Butler's background includes research in traumatic stress and other psychosocial outcomes in a number of populations. Her extreme events interests include the study of factors associated with traumatic stress, resilience, and/or posttraumatic growth outcomes following traumatic events, such as terrorist acts, as well as developing new research examining the nature of traumatic stress reactions in the context of living under threat.

Eliza Calder

Eliza Calder Photo

Assistant Professor

Geology

University at Buffalo

861 Natural Science Complex

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6800 ext 2252

 

Center for Geohazard Studies

University at Buffalo

429 Cooke Hall

Buffalo, NY 14206

 

webpage: http://www.geology.buffalo.edu/people/faculty/calder.shtml

Research Interests:

Explosive volcanic processes; Pyroclastic deposits; Volcanic hazards; Volcano monitoring

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Lava domes are piles of viscous magma that, in essence, form bulbous plugs on top of volcanic vents. They grow slowly as partially solidified magma is squeezed up the volcanic conduit, and they can host high internal pressures as gases exsolving from the magma try to escape. Lava dome eruptions are notorious for they often suddenly transform from being benignly effusive to violently explosive: Sudden removal of these ‘plugs’, either by vertically-driven explosions, caused once the internal gas pressure exceeds the tensile strength of rock, or sudden collapse and spontaneous disintegration as the piles grow and become unstable, can have devastating consequences. These collapse events spawn one of the major hazard in volcanology; devastating pyroclastic density currents, which move down the flanks of the volcano at speeds of up to 60 m/s. One of the projects that I am currently working on concerns the improved understanding and forecasting of lava dome collapses and has immediate and practical applications pertaining to the management of several on-going volcanic crisis. The work is based on the Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) eruption, Montserrat, combined with preliminary comparative studies from two other active lava dome eruptions, Mount St Helens, USA, and Santiaguito, Guatemala. Such eruptions occur with relative frequency, are potentially extremely destructive and can continue for years-to decades. The real merits will be reaped when relationships unearthed during this study are usefully and successfully applied to dome forming eruptions elsewhere.

Lava dome and ash plume generated by a dome collapse event at Soufrière Hills volcano in 1997.

Lava dome and ash plume generated by a dome collapse event at Soufrière Hills volcano in 1997.

Anthony A. Campagnari

Anthony A. Campagnari Photo

Professor

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

143 Biomedical Research Bldg

3435 Main St

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2593

 

Medicine

 

Research Interests:

Moraxella catarrhalis; Acinetobacter baumannii; pathogenesis; adhesins; virulence; biofilms; vaccine antigens

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The importance of Acinetobacter baumannii infections in war-related injuries is now well established. A. baumannii was the most common gram-negative bacillus recovered from traumatic injuries to the lower extremities during the Vietnam War. More recently a new series of infections was reported in U.S. service personnel injured in the Iraq/Kuwait/Afghanistan regions. Likewise, A. baumannii has become an emerging pathogen of increasing importance in Veterans Administration and civilian healthcare facilities, with the incidence of A. baumannii infection increasing worldwide. This emergence of A. baumannii is due in large part to its ability to survive under a wide range of environmental conditions including those within healthcare facilities. Further, infections on foreign bodies such as intravascular devices and orthopedic hardware are virtually impossible to cure with antimicrobials alone. In addition multi- and pandrug resistant isolates are increasing. Thus, there is an increasing concern that A. baumannii strains may acquire new virulence factors that could lead to a sudden and significant rise in untreatable infections worldwide.

Werner Ceusters

Werner Ceusters Photo

Professor and Director of Ontology Research Group

Psychiatry

University at Buffalo

701 Ellicott St

Suite B2-160

Buffalo, NY 14203

716-881-8971

 

webpage: http://www.referent-tracking.com/RTU/

Research Interests:

Realism-based ontology; Biomedical terminology; Electronic Health records; Semantic Interoperability; Data integration; Referent Tracking; Event modeling

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Realism-based ontology is a key competence of the Ontology Research Group of the Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics & Life Sciences which includes researchers from the departments of Philosophy and Psychiatry and the Dental School. Relevant projects fall in three categories: (1) building domain ontologies (e.g. infectious diseases, adverse events, ...) based on the upper ontology ‘Basic Formal Ontology” (BFO); (2) building application ontologies based on the former, but designed for specific purposes (battlefield awareness, detecting risks against patient safety in hospitals, …) and (3) making heterogeneous information systems semantically interoperable by building ontologies that describe the portions of reality about which data are stored in these systems, and by applying the Referent Tracking paradigm which aims to assign globally and singular unique identifiers to each entity in reality about which data is stored in any of the information systems.

Deborah D.L. Chung

Deborah D.L. Chung Photo

National Grid Endowed Chair Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

608 Furnas Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2243

 

webpage: http://alum.mit.edu/www/ddlchung

Research Interests:

Smart materials & structures; Multifunctional structural materials; Strain, stress and damage sensing; Structural health monitoring; Structural vibration control; Electromagnetic interference shielding; Traffic & evacuation monitoring; Energy generation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Recent research relates to the use of multifunctional cement-based materials developed by Professor Chung to sense strain, stress and damage and to generate electricity. Stress sensing is relevant to evacuation monitoring in relation to buildings and highways. Damage sensing is relevant to damage assessment and hazard mitigation. Electricity generation by cement-based materials allows individual structures to generate their own energy, thereby alleviating the problem of power outage. The multifunctional cement-based materials technologies are available for licensing and field testing.

Sam Cole

Sam Cole Photo

Professor

Urban and Regional Planning

University at Buffalo

203 Hayes Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2133 ext 203

 

webpage: http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/~samcole/

Research Interests:

Global futures studies; Regional economic development; Tourism; Island planning; Crisis Management

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Trained in the UK as a theoretical physicist, Sam has worked in community, regional and international planning and development since 1970. Projects with MCEER are reported in Social Accounting for Disaster Management and Recovery Planning (NCEER-93-0002, also published in Kunreuther and Rose, The Economics of Natural Hazards, Vo1, 2004) and Regional and Inter-regional Calamity Preparedness and Decision Support (in Engineering and Socioeconomic Impacts of Earthquakes, Shinozuka et al., MCEER, 1998). He has contributed to seminars on Disaster Preparedness in the Europe, China, Latin America, West Africa, the US and China. In 2005, he was awarded an MCEER/NSF US-China collaboration grant. His current work involves the integration of portfolio and risk management theories into models of chaos and complexity to understand the dynamic relationships between hazards, events, protection, disruptions, and disasters in socio-economic systems (summarized in Journal of Security Education, 2006).

Terry D. Connell

Terry D. Connell Photo

Professor

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

147 Biomedical Research Bldg

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3364

 

webpage: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/wcmpi/Faculty/connell.html

Research Interests:

Gram-negative bacteria; Bordetella; Enteric bacteria; Vibrio cholerae; Gene regulation; Adjuvants; Mucosal immunology; Vaccines

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Research in the Connell lab is focused in two areas: (1) microbial pathogenesis and (2) mucosal immunology. In the field of microbial pathogenesis, we are employing recombinant biology, physiology, and biochemistry to evaluate the methods by which Bordetella pertussis and B. bronchiseptica, respiratory pathogens of humans and other animals, acquire nutrient iron and heme from the fluids, cells, and tissues of the host during infection. We have identified several iron uptake systems. Expression of these systems is tightly controlled by three-component regulatory systems that respond to extracellular sources of iron. We have also investigated protein secretion in the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Our immunological research focuses upon evaluating the molecular, cellular, and organismal mechanisms by which two novel bacterial enterotoxins potentiate mucosal and systemic immune responses to foreign antigens. These later studies to investigate the adjuvant activities of those enterotoxins have direct implications in vaccine development.

Michael C. Constantinou

Michael C. Constantinou Photo

Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

212 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2404

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:michael-c-constantinou/

Research Interests:

Structural dynamics; Dynamic testing and performance-based engineering with particular emphasis in the development and use of new technologies

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Constantinou is credited with major contributions in the development and implementation of seismic isolation systems, viscous energy dissipation systems (dampers) and the toggle-brace and scissor-jack systems (60 citations in newspapers and magazines) in various types of civil infrastructures. This picture illustrates a gas platform currently under construction in an environment characterized by strong earthquake, extremely low temperature, strong wind and ice impact loadings. Dr. Constantinou developed procedures for the analysis, design, scaling and testing of seismic isolation bearings for two such platforms that can sustain extreme loadings in a multi-hazard environment.

John L. Crassidis

John L. Crassidis Photo

Professor and Associate Director, Center for Multisource Information Fusion

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

1007 Furnas Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2262

 

webpage: http://www.buffalo.edu/~johnc

Research Interests:

Data/Information fusion; Optimal nonlinear estimation, Robust vehicle tracking and navigation; Situational awareness

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Crassidis’s research involves the development of generalized multiple-model adaptive estimation (GMMAE) strategies that are used to provide significant convergence rate improvements of system model parameter and state identification, as well as enhanced probabilistic assignments of outcomes. Specific extreme event applications involve the use of GMMAE to provide risk assessment tools for situational refinement using both sensor and contextual data inputs. As Associate Director of the Center for Multisource Information Fusion (CMIF), Dr. Crassidis is responsible for level-1 fusion applications, which involve observation-to-track association, continuous state estimation (e.g. kinematics) and discrete state estimation (e.g. target type and ID) and prediction. Currently, a consortium between the University at Buffalo through CMIF, Texas A&M University and Virginia Tech is being conceived with the ultimate goal of mitigating disaster response coordination through the use of robotic sensors and uninhabited air vehicles in conjunction with state-of-the-art data fusion techniques.

Beata Csatho

Beata Csatho Photo

Associate Professor

Geology

University at Buffalo

411 Cooke Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6800 ext 3921

 

Research Interests:

Geographic Information Science; Remote Sensing; Geohazard Monitoring; Glaciology

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Remote sensing and data fusion technologies are crucial for improving our understanding of the physical processes involved in extreme events, for assessing their larger-area impacts, and for creating a vital area of interface between hazard sciences and cyberinfrastructure. Dr. Csatho's research is related to the understanding of the complex dynamics of the Earth's system and its interaction with the human environment. To process, merge and analyze data sets from multiple sources, she adopts methodologies from geophysics, remote sensing, photogrammetry, geodesy, spatial statistics, GIS, visualization, digital image processing, pattern recognition, and data fusion. Her current research includes the development of image understanding, registration and data fusion methods for rapid mapping and monitoring of urban environments, the development of airborne and satellite laser mapping methods for investigating geodynamics, environmental changes, ice sheet mass balance and glacier dynamics; and the application of remote sensing, GPS and photogrammetry for characterizing of ice flow, volcanic geomorphology and crustal deformation.

Murat Demirbas

Murat Demirbas Photo

Assistant Professor

Computer Science and Engineering

University at Buffalo

201 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-3180 ext 139

 

webpage: http://www.cse.buffalo.edu/~demirbas/

Research Interests:

Wireless sensor networks; Wireless ad hoc communication and networking; Distributed algorithms for tracking, localization, and in-network on-the-fly querying

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Demirbas works in the area of wireless sensor networks (WSNs), a successful realization of the ubiquitous/pervasive computing paradigm. A significant application of WSNs is in the area of environmental and structural monitoring and the related problems of classifying, localizing, and tracking of events of interest. Dr. Demirbas’s research focuses on developing distributed, robust, and resilient tracking, in-network querying, and communication services for WSNs. Dr. Demirbas received an NSF CAREER Award in 2008 for his work on wireless sensor/actor networks.

Paul E. DesJardin

Paul E. DesJardin Photo

Assistant Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

336 Jarvis Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2314

 

webpage: http://www.mae.buffalo.edu/people/faculty/desjardin/

Research Interests:

Fire science and safety engineering; Computational fluid dynamics with an emphasis on the radiation heat transfer from large scale plumes and fluid-structure coupled response

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. DesJardin conducts research and teaches classes in the area of fire simulation science. His primary areas of interest are fire plume dynamics, radiation heat transfer and flame spread modeling. As part of these efforts, he has developed a suite of simulation tools for examining the coupled fluid-structure response of composite materials to fire environments. The figure shows a representative result from a fire plume study to examine the role of near-field turbulent flow dynamics on the radiation heat transfer from large reacting plumes.

William H. Dice

William H. Dice Photo

Clinical Assistant Professor

Emergency Medicine

Erie County Medical Center

462 Grider St

Buffalo, NY 14215

716-898-3525

 

webpage: http://www.wnysmart.org

Research Interests:

Disaster Medicine; Disaster Training; Triage; Medical Informatics; Telehealth; Emergency Preparedness

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Dice incorporated a prospective controlled and blinded study of antibiotic dispensing accuracy into a regional emergency preparedness exercise. The exercise simulated dispensing emergency prophylactic antibiotics to workers exposed to anthrax spores. Algorithms were provided to volunteers who were asked to properly provide the correct antibiotic to people with various medical conditions and/or who were taking common prescription medications. Volunteers were able to dispense correctly in 99.5% of cases.

Steven L Dubovsky

Steven L Dubovsky Photo

Professor and Chair

Psychiatry

Erie County Medical Center

462 Grider St

Room 1182

Buffalo, NY 14215

716-898-5940

 

Research Interests:

Psychopharmacology; Anxiety and mood disorders; Disaster response

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Dubovsky has participated in the development of new medications and the pharmacologic treatment of responses to extreme events. He is currently co-director of a multi-center randomized controlled trial of the treatment of refractory post traumatic stress disorder. He is working with an interdisciplinary group to develop a virtual reality model that will make it possible to test protocols for disaster response. He is also investigating factors that interfere with efficacy of first responders and he is developing a center for traumatic response with the Department of Psychology. He is on the founding board of directors of Protect NY.

Catherine N. Dulmus

Catherine N. Dulmus Photo

Associate Dean for Research and Director, Buffalo Center for Social Research

Social Work

University at Buffalo

221 Parker Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3991 ext. 139

 

webpage: http://www.socialwork.buffalo.edu/research/

Research Interests:

Child mental health; Trauma; Prevention; Violence

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Dulmus’ research focuses on violence and its psychological impact on children. She is particularly interested in violence prevention and the development of preventive interventions. Her most recent research has been related to school violence, in particular examining the role of bullying in school violence.

Isaac Ehrlich

Isaac Ehrlich Photo

SUNY/UB Distinguished Professor & Chair, Melvin H. Baker Professor of American Enterprise

Economics

University at Buffalo

415 Fronczak Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2121 ext 422

 

webpage: http://wings.buffalo.edu/economics/ehrlich.htm

Research Interests:

Human capital and income distribution; Economic growth and development; Economics of health and value of life savings; Social security and population aging; Economics of information and uncertainty; Economics of crime and justice; Law and economics

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The general objective of our project "Econometric Modeling of WNY" is to use state of the art statistical and economic methods to model the behavior of the Western and Upstate New York economies and use it for both simulation analyses and forecasting. The relevance of the project for extreme events comes about mainly from the flexibility of the comprehensive and detailed model we are working on. Specifically, extreme events of various types, scope and severity could be introduced into our model via jump or regime-shifting stochastic processes. By including such rare events, the model could not only generate and forecast changes in key economic variables defining the economy at a point in time and over time, but also allow researchers and policy makers to compute risk management measures such as Value at Risk, which evaluate changes in variables of special interest at the time of emergency.

Andre Filiatrault

Andre Filiatrault Photo

Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

212 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2434

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:andre-filiatrault/

Research Interests:

Structural dynamics; Earthquake engineering; Seismic performance of structures with passive supplemental damping systems, nonstructural components & equipment; Seismic testing of large-scale structural components & systems; Design of wood structures

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

André Filiatrault’s research over the past twenty years has been centered on the seismic testing, analysis and design of civil engineering structures. Professor Filiatrault conducted several numerical and experimental investigations on the seismic response of large-scale structural and nonstructural components and systems. In 2003, he led the first shake table test in the US of a full-scale 500 kV electrical transformer tank-bushing assembly. In 2006, he led the seismic testing of the largest wood building ever tested on a shake table worldwide. Recent accomplishments also include: the development of seismic design guidelines for pallet-type steel storage racks, the seismic testing of wood buildings incorporating passive damping systems, the development of computer software for the seismic analysis of wood buildings, and the seismic fragility testing of HVAC equipment mounted on vibration isolation/restraint systems and of piping-partition-ceiling systems.

Mark G. Frank

Mark G. Frank Photo

Associate Professor and Director, Communication Science Center

Communication

University at Buffalo

Fargo Quad Suite 101

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-6401

 

Research Interests:

Deception; Detecting Deception; Facial Expressions; Emotions; Interpersonal Interaction

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

A terrorist act is a profoundly human act, and my research examines people’s behaviors in security settings, including counter-terrorism, intelligence gathering, law enforcement and the legal system. Our work looks at what clues are associated with deception and malfeasant intentions, as well as how good are people at spotting such clues, whether we can train people to spot them better, what sort of interpersonal styles optimize intelligence gathering in interviews, and whether we can create automated systems that might facilitate the identification of individuals who intend to commit an extreme event, or catching the perpetrators of such an act.

James F. Garvey

James F. Garvey Photo

Professor

Chemistry

University at Buffalo

460 Natural Sciences Complex

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6800 ext 2106

 

webpage: http://www.chem.buffalo.edu/garvey.php

Research Interests:

Sterilizing air; Compressive heating; Purifying large gas flows; Killing anthrax; SARS; MARS; Legionnaire’s disease; Avian flu; TB; Airborne pathogens

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The BioBlower device was created to rapidly and continuously cycle large quantities of air (or aerosolized liquid), while simultaneously sterilizing the entire flow of air, as it passes through the apparatus. The BioBlower is designed to continuously destroy ALL biological pathogens within the air flow, including all bacteria, spores, viruses, pollen and molds that are harmful to humans. It accomplishes this complete air purification without the use of filters, without the use of UV/X-ray light and without the use of any toxic fumigant! The BioBlower accomplishes this complete bio-kill through the completely novel approach of compressive heating of the air stream as it is quickly cycled through a standard electrically powered rotary pump. This prompt, uniform heating instantly kills any and all bio-matter (i.e., anthrax spores, smallpox, SARS, influenza, tuberculosis, E. Coli, mold, fungi, allergens, etc…) in the air flow, ‘blowing’ breathable, disinfected air back into the building/room/tent. A key advantage to this technology is that the process is inherently scaleable. The BioBlower can be small enough to act as a portable unit for tent inflation, or to create an isolation ward on demand. In contrast, the BioBlower can be manufactured as large as to be permanently installed within a building, to handle the entire air flow of the structure. The BioBlower can be employed in many applications, but not limited to: military use against bioterror attacks on buildings, portable shelters or vehicles, hospital quarantine rooms, reverse isolation rooms, biological clean rooms, and for both government and commercial office buildings. Our initial target market is the military which, in the Collective Protection area alone is estimated at several billion dollars in size. We are targeting in parallel the hospital quarantine and reverse isolation rooms. We will expand into related markets and segments such as commercial buildings as success is achieved in the military/government market and as the company grows.

Tracy K.P. Gregg

Tracy K.P. Gregg Photo

Associate Professor

Geology

University at Buffalo

411 Cooke Hall (mail)

860 Natural Sciences Complex (office)

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6800 ext 2463

 

webpage: http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/

Research Interests:

Lava flow eruption and emplacement dynamics in different environments (on land, under water, on Mars, Io and Venus)

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Lava flows, and their associated destruction of property, are indeed extreme events. Dr. Gregg is working on determining what controls how a lava flow will move, and where it will go; she used a combination of field work, petrologic studies, laboratory simulations and numerical modeling to constrain lava flow dynamics. Recent work has focused on volcanic eruptions on Io, and how they are similar to and different from volcanic behavior on Earth. The image shows an eruption within Tvashtar Patera on Io. The dark feature is a lava flow, and the heat from the lava is vaporizing the underlying ground, causing white jets of gas to shoot out from the flow margins. The image, collected by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, is ~120 km across.

Philip Hancock

Philip Hancock Photo

Visiting Assistant Professor

Management

University at Buffalo

333 Jacobs Management Center

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-3271

 

Research Interests:

Operations management; Emergency response management; Social network analysis; Statistical modelling; Table-top simulation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

A large-scale emergency response relies on a single decision-maker, the incident commander to spontaneously allocate resources that change continuously in both availability and status responding to dynamic incidents. The figure below represents a social network of directed radio communications during a recent table-top simulation. Line weight represents volume of communication.

John Hay

John Hay Photo

Professor and Chair

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

138 Farber Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2907

 

Research Interests:

Viruses; Human infectious disease; Animal infectious disease; Pathogenesis; Epidemiology; Epizootiology; Genetics

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

I currently have funded projects from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Biotechnology Extension Program (DHHS) to explore the extent of disease and identification of agents involved in highly fatal human viral diseases in several parts of the world. The agents include hantaviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus and several fevers of unknown origin. The case-fatality ratio of the diseases in as high as 80% in some cases, and there is no vaccine or other treatment available. Many are transmitted to humans by biting insects (e.g. ticks or mosquitoes) which makes control and avoidance of contact difficult. We are using real-time PCR approaches to investigate the genomes of these agents, with a view to developing vaccines or novel antiviral treatments. We are also using GIS technology to map the viruses, their reservoir hosts and their vectors. This work is being pursued in central Asia and Siberia.

Daniel B. Hess

Daniel B. Hess Photo

Associate Professor

Urban and Regional Planning

University at Buffalo

116 Hayes Hall

3435 Main Street

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829.2133 ext 202

 

webpage: http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/planning/people/hess.asp

Research Interests:

Emergency planning and preparedness; Evacuation; Transportation planning; Public transit

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Hess traveled to New Orleans with a team of MCEER researchers shortly after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 and again subsequent to Hurricane Gustav in 2008. He is the PI for an NSF grant to assess changes to hospital emergency plans and outcomes. His research there focused on investigating hospital disaster preparedness and response and finding ways to strengthen the resilience of medical infrastructure during extreme events (http://mceer.buffalo.edu/publications/reconnaissance/08-SP07/default.asp). His other projects have focused on emergency planning for and security assessment of surface transportation in cities and regions, especially public transit systems. A current research project focuses on the ability of Upstate New York cities and regions to perform a complete evacuation during an extreme event.

Gregory G. Homish

Gregory G. Homish Photo

Assistant Professor

Health Behavior

University at Buffalo

325 Kimball Tower

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-6959

 

Research Assistant Professor

Family Medicine

 

webpage: http://sphhp.buffalo.edu/hb/faculty/homish_greg.php

Research Interests:

Epidemiology; Emergency Preparedness; Mental Health; Substance Use

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Homish serves as the Principal Investigator on a grant that examines increasing multijurisdictional collaborations for public health emergency response. This grant is part of the Western New York Public Health Alliance’s Advanced Practice Center (http://www.wnypha.org/Home/Programs/AdvancedPracticeCenter). The Western New York Advanced Practice Center (APC) is one of seven funded centers in the United States charged with developing tools for Public Health Emergency Response. The Western New York APC is the only center that specifically focuses on rural health public health emergency preparedness. Dr. Homish is a member of the Mental Health sector of the Erie County Specialized Medical Assistance Response Team (SMART). Dr. Homish is also a PI and co-investigator on several grants that examine changes in substance use patterns among adults.

Igor Jankovic

Igor Jankovic Photo

Associate Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

231 Jarvis Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716 645-2114 ext 2328

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:igor-jankovic/

Research Interests:

Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport, Stochastic Modeling, Numerical Methods

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Jankovic does not currently have any projects related to extreme events.

Dietrich Jehle

Dietrich Jehle Photo

Professor and Director of Emergency Ultrasonography

Emergency Medicine

University at Buffalo

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-859-1993

 

Associate Medical Director

Erie County Medical Center

462 Grider Street

Buffalo, NY 14215

716-898-4431

 

Research Interests:

Emergency Medicine; Bedside Sonography; Transportation Injury; Resuscitation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dietrich Jehle has been principal investigator on several federally funded studies of traffic safety, investigating accident and fatality rates as they correspond to speed variance and road design, vehicle weight, seat belt usage and other variables involved in car crashes.This research is conducted through the Center for Transportation Injury Research and the Calspan University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC). He is one of the country’s leading clinical practitioners, instructors and researchers in emergency bedside ultrasonography. An imaging technique commonly used in obstetrics and internal medicine, ultrasonography was slower to develop in EM but has proven to be an extremely effective tool in expediting diagnosis and improving treatment efficacy in trauma centers around the country. ECMC has recently been recognized as having the best trauma outcomes of any of the 50 trauma centers in New York State.

James N. Jensen

James N. Jensen Photo

Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

212 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2329

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:james-n-jensen/

Research Interests:

Drinking water treatment; drinking water distribution; wastewater treatment; wastewater collection

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Jensen directed an on-site reconnaissance survey of public health infrastructure (including delivery of potable water and wastewater services) in New Orleans and southwestern Louisiana following Hurricanes Rita and Katrina. The work of the reconnaissance team pointed to the need to maintain drinking water distribution system pressures and protect biomass in wastewater treatment.

Richard J. Karalus

Richard J. Karalus Photo

Director of Microbiology

CUBRC

4455 Genesee Street

P.O. Box 400, B3-307 Center of Excellence

Buffalo, NY 14225

716-631-6900

 

Research Assistant Professor

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

139 Biomedical Research Bldg

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3053

 

webpage: http://www.cubrc.org

Research Interests:

Biodefense related issues including biodetection, the development of novel therapeutics, decontamination, and aerosol biology modeling

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The CUBRC laboratories have been developing biological agent detection systems that utilize state of the art molecular detection strategies. These systems are capable of accepting crude environmental samples, isolating and purifying DNA and performing detection on disposable cartridges. The detection strategies utilize real-time PCR and microarray technology, and are capable of rapidly detecting down to the single numbers of biological agents. These detectors could be employed at strategic sites to provide early warning in the event of an attack with biological agents so that exposed persons may seek treatment

Kathleen A. Kost

Kathleen A. Kost Photo

Associate Professor

Social Work

University at Buffalo

685 Baldy Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-1269

 

Research Interests:

Social networks; Poverty; Employment

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Kost is currently co-editor of a book with Robin Ersing from Florida State University entitled Surviving disaster: The role of social networks and is also the coauthor of three of the book’s eight chapters. The book suggests that disaster preparedness must begin at the level of strengthening social networks between individuals, families, organizations, neighborhoods and communities. The absence of a social capital perspective from this discussion can lead to an over-emphasis on hazard plans rather than an assessment of the ability of a community to respond to unexpected events and the development of mechanisms that promote the care and protection of its most vulnerable citizens.

Venkat N. Krovi

Venkat N. Krovi Photo

Associate Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

1011 Furnas Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2264

 

webpage: http://mechatronics.eng.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Lifecycle treatment (design, modeling, analysis, control, implementation and verification) of smart, mechanical, mechatronic and robotic systems

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Our guiding vision is to create and evaluate an overall framework for cooperative payload transport by fleets of autonomous wheeled modules. Individual modules can be coupled together to create larger composite-wheeled systems in various shapes and sizes. Tremendous benefits accrue from the resulting system that can be controlled as a single large collective and can actively be reconfigured into various formation shapes to enhance performance. To this end, our research team is applying lessons learned from natural biological collectives (such as armies of ants) to implement scalable and decentralized cooperative manipulation in artificial robot collectives. Application arenas range from industrial applications, where suitable numbers of such modules can be tasked to manipulate variable-sized payloads, to extreme-event applications, where individual rover modules sent on separate missions can cooperate to support search-and-rescue efforts.

Chris Larsen

Chris Larsen Photo

Associate Professor

Geography

University at Buffalo

105 Wilkeson

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-2722 ext 31

 

webpage: http://www.geog.buffalo.edu/~larsen

Research Interests:

Inter-relations between climate change; Fire frequency and forest composition

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Larsen’s research examines how recent climate and past climate changes have resulted in changes in fire frequency in the boreal and montane forests of Alberta. In the past, cool and dry climates facilitated a high frequency of fires that became reduced as temperature and precipitation increased. Fire control has reduced fire frequency beyond what is expected due to recent climatic change, and this should result in a change in forest composition towards longer-lived tree species. More recent research is being conducted to evaluate if species growth- and mortality-rates are consistent with predictions based on an equilibrial 2XCO2 environment.

George C. Lee

George C. Lee Photo

SUNY Distinguished Professor and Samuel P. Capen Professor of Engineering

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

429 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2039

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:george-c-lee/

Research Interests:

Seismic design and retrofit of buildings and bridges; Multiple hazard design principles and guidelines; Structural response modification technologies

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Lee was the Director of MCEER between 1992 and 2002. He has dedicated a major effort to establishing the theme of MCEER by engaging multidisciplinary team efforts in earthquake engineering research to develop quantifiable earthquake resilient communities. Since 2002, Dr. Lee has been working on the development of advanced technologies for multi-hazard protection of critical buildings and infrastructure systems as a new frontier of earthquake engineering research. He is the principal investigator of several current research projects including “Design of Steel Buildings Against Earthquake and Post-Earthquake Fire,” “Multiple Hazard Protection of Large Public Buildings,” sponsored by the National Science Foundation; and “Multi-hazard Design of Highway Bridges,” a major research contract sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration. Since the World Trade Center disaster, he has advanced the concept of a new engineering research and educational program on “Disaster Engineering.”

The Critical Building (Hospital) with Multiple Hazard Monitoring 
and Decision Support System

The Critical Building (Hospital) with Multiple Hazard Monitoring and Decision Support System

Kemper Lewis

Kemper Lewis Photo

Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

1010 Furnas Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2232

 

Executive Director

NYSCEDII

University at Buffalo

5 Norton Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2685

 

webpage: http://www.mae.buffalo.edu/people/faculty/lewis/

Research Interests:

Reconfigurable systems design; Multiobjective decision making; Tradeoff modeling and visualization; Game theory; Decision making under uncertainty; Extreme event visualization and simulation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Lewis’ current work focuses on the design of reconfigurable systems and infrastructures that are able to perform optimally in a wide range of operating conditions, often encountered in extreme event planning and response. Fundamental research includes theoretical developments on reconfigurable systems, control algorithms to ensure stable system reconfiguration, optimization methods for multiobjective decision tradeoffs, and modeling and simulation of decentralized decision processes under uncertainty. His work with NYSCEDII includes investigating how extreme event preparedness as well as mitigation and response would be better enabled and facilitated through use of simulation, immersive environments, and web-based systems. NYSCEDII’s expertise in developing web-based collaboration, simulation, and visualization infrastructures enables decision support both before (e.g. facility design, evacuation planning, reconfigurable systems design) and after (e.g., damage visualization, distributed decision support) extreme events. NYSCEDII’s research in coupling complex system simulation with visualization and human-computer interfaces (HCI) supports the development of interactive training simulations for first responders and the assessment of extreme events. Previous applications have included the simulation and visualization of volcanic eruptions/flows and critical infrastructures within hospitals.

Left: Formalizing tradeoffs for alternative reconfigurable system options; Right: Web-based visualization, simulation, and decision support for volcanic regions

Left: Formalizing tradeoffs for alternative reconfigurable system options; Right: Web-based visualization, simulation, and decision support for volcanic regions

Li Lin

Li Lin Photo

Professor

Industrial and Systems Engineering

University at Buffalo

437 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2357 ext 2119

 

Research Interests:

Simulation modeling and analysis of operations in complex and critical systems; Delivery of health care services

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Lin’s research includes estimation of hospital capacity in a disaster situation by computer simulation – simulation models are developed to capture the hospital response to the sudden surge of patient volume from the disaster injuries. Empirical models are then derived from the simulation results that can predict the hospitals’ capability of treating injuries in the critical hours after the disaster. Modeling of hospitals’ operations are based on extensive projects with several hospitals in studying the performance of ED’s (Emergency Department) and OR’s.

Anne E. Meyer

Anne E. Meyer Photo

Research Associate Professor

Industry/University Center for Biosurfaces

University at Buffalo

110 Parker Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3560

 

webpage: http://wings.buffalo.edu/faculty/research/iucb

Research Interests:

Biofouling, infection control; Analytical chemistry,; Surface science; Bioinvasions; Biofilms

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Bioinvasive species, ranging from macrofoulers like zebra mussels to infective microbes, have entered the Great Lakes ecosystem from other world ports via transport in ballast water and ballast tank biofilms from commercial vessels using the St. Lawrence Seaway system. Potential disease outbreaks from pathogenic species carried ashore as bioaerosols from ballast water discharges can originate in biofilm-sequestered microbial reservoirs or as deliberate threats. Detection and monitoring of these risk factors using biofilm flow cell devices aboard ship, and bioaerosol collection/analysis devices on shore, have been successful in projects funded by Sea Grant programs. Published results document the continuing risk that ballast tank biofilms serve as "vertical seed beds" for bioinvasive species, and that current international regulations for at-sea ballast tank flushing are not adequate to remove threat particulates of microbial dimensions. Proposed improvements include provision of "easy-release" marine coatings, and modification of operating procedures to minimize bioaerosol production.

Deborah Moore-Russo

Deborah Moore-Russo Photo

Assistant Professor

Learning and Instruction

University at Buffalo

Graduate School of Education

566 Baldy Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2455 ext 1266

 

webpage: http://www.gse.buffalo.edu/faculty/viewfaculty.asp?id=41

Research Interests:

Spatial visualization and communication; STEM applications of K-12 mathematics

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Moore-Russo recently helped create an all-inclusive web resource (http://mceer.buffalo.edu/connected_teaching/index.html) linking the study of earthquakes and engineering design to middle grades science, mathematics and technology.

Michael D. Moskal

Michael D. Moskal Photo

Vice President, Information Exploitation Group

CUBRC

4455 Genesee Street

Buffalo, NY 14225

716-631-6923

 

webpage: http://www.cubrc.org

Research Interests:

Emergency Management; Information Fusion; Computer Science and Engineering; Modeling and Simulation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Mr. Moskal currently serves as the Director of CUBRC’s Information Exploitation and Systems Integration group where he is responsible for general management and new business development for a $9.0M business unit. This business unit performs information system R&D for the U.S. Government DoD and Intelligence communities in addition to a variety of Federal, State and Local Public Health and Safety agencies. He served as the lead systems integrator and developer for a regional syndromic surveillance system that was deployed in Western New York. This regional system is designed to provide early warning of a bio-terrorism event or other disease outbreaks through the collection and analysis of medical data obtained from a variety of sources including: 911 Call Center Data, EMS Patient Care Reports, Emergency Department Triage records and other clinical data. Aside from his professional employment, Mr. Moskal spent 12 years as the Director of Emergency Management (Disaster Coordinator) for the Village of Depew, New York where he developed and implemented the first-ever comprehensive emergency management plan for that community.

Jeff Myers

Jeff Myers Photo

Clinical Assistant Professor and EMS Fellowship Director

Emergency Medicine

Erie County Medical Center

462 Grider St

Buffalo, NY 14215

716-898-3525

 

Research Interests:

Human patient simulation; virtual reality; Emergency Medical Services; Prehospital Medicine; Disaster Medicine; medical education

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Myers does not currently have any projects related to extreme events.

JiYoung Park

JiYoung Park Photo

Assistant Professor

Urban and Regional Planning

University at Buffalo

201F Hayes Hall

3435 Main St Bldg 1

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3485 ext 209

 

webpage: http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/planning/people/park.asp

Research Interests:

Economic/Transportation System Modeling and Impact Analysis; Disaster and Security Planning; Environmental/Energy Economics; Transportation Planning; Urban/Regional Economics; Applied and Spatial Econometrics

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Professor JiYoung Park developed National Interstate Economic Model (NIEMO), a spatially disaggregated operational MRIO (Multiregional Input-Output) model of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The NIEMO is used to analyze economic impacts resulting from natural disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and hypothetical terrorist attacks (See Figure 1 for NIEMO modeling and development process). He extends NIEMO by including: (1) transportation and multi-modal systems, (2) international countries, (3) temporal extension, (4) price elasticity of demand, (5) HAZUS software, and (6) game theory. The extensions provide us to estimate the economic impacts spilled over regionally and periodically from important infrastructure disruptions in the U.S. including resilient effects. He is also consulting with local governments, e.g. Southern California Government Association (SCAG), for constructing local economic and transportation models which forecast the future of the region’s economic indices and transportation patterns if an extreme event occurs in a local region.

NIEMO Modeling and Development process

NIEMO Modeling and Development process

Abani K. Patra

Abani K. Patra Photo

Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

605 Furnas

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2240

 

webpage: http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~abani

Research Interests:

Large scale modeling & simulation using modeling schemes & HPC for extreme events including geophysical mass flows (volcanic debris avalanches, mudslides); Hypervelocity impact; Biomechanical injury analysis; Meshfree & adaptive finite element methods

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Funded by the National Science Foundation, we have recently developed the TITAN toolkit for hazard analysis of geophysical mass flows. The toolset is in use by over 200 research scientists and hazard management officials worldwide. The toolset integrates best available mathematical models, advanced numerical methodology with geographical information science to produce simulations that are very useful for hazard analysis. A recent development is the characterization of the effect of uncertain input parameters on model outputs. Others involved in this project are M. Sheridan, E. B. Pitman, M. Bursik, E. Calder, T. Kesavadas.

E. Bruce Pitman

E. Bruce Pitman Photo

Professor

Math

University at Buffalo

318 Mathematics Building

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6284

 

webpage: http://www.math.buffalo.edu/~pitman

Research Interests:

Mathematical modeling; High performance computing

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

As part of an interdisciplinary project with colleagues in engineering, geology and geography, Professor Pitman has developed mathematical models describing pyroclastic flows, debris flows, and granular avalanches – common geophysical mass flows. These models have been integrated into TITAN2D, a computing environment that solves the model equations over terrain. Pitman and his colleagues are developing new computational methods that can be used to simulate mass flows. He is developing tools to understand how uncertainty in model equations – uncertainty in parameters, in data, and in the models themselves – must be accounted for in assessing hazard risks.

Michael J. Poulin

Michael J. Poulin Photo

Assistant Professor

Psychology

University at Buffalo

368-B Park Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-0518

 

webpage: http://psychology.buffalo.edu/directory/faculty/people/poulin/

Research Interests:

Physical and psychological adjustment to stress and trauma; prosocial motivation (volunteering and altruism); meaning

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

In his past and ongoing work, Dr. Poulin has examined how individuals respond to stressful or traumatic events. For collective traumas such as natural disasters or terror attacks, this process is closely tied to individuals’ interactions with their social context. For example, his recent research, in the form of a large, 3-year national survey, indicates that low-level but persistent symptoms of posttraumatic stress following 9/11 predict support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and more aggressive domestic policies (curtailment of civil liberties, use of torture). This work suggests one way in which societal responses to extreme events are shaped by individual responses to these events.

Pavani Ram

Pavani Ram Photo

Assistant Professor

Social and Preventive Medicine

University at Buffalo

273 Farber Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-5380

 

webpage: http://sphhp.buffalo.edu/spm/faculty/ram_pavani.php

Research Interests:

Epidemiology; Infectious disease; Prevention; Child survival

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Hygiene and water quality are often compromised in extreme events, due to the interruption of routine municipal supplies, as well as disruptions in social order. Handwashing with soap has been shown to reduce the risk of diarrhea and pneumonia by about 50% in young children in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization “recommends that all countries undertake urgent action to prepare for a pandemic” of influenza (www.who.int). Dr. Ram is currently pursuing studies to determine whether intensive promotion of handwashing with soap will reduce the risk of influenza transmission to young children, and to household contacts, in low-income settings. This work is expected to substantially inform international efforts to plan for the next influenza pandemic, particularly in the low-income and complex emergency settings where influenza transmission is expected to be intense in a pandemic situation.

Andrei M. Reinhorn

Andrei M. Reinhorn Photo

Clifford C Furnas Eminent Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

135 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2419

 

webpage: http://civil.eng.buffalo.edu/~reinhorn

Research Interests:

Structural dynamics; Experimental and computational structural control; Development of strategies for protective systems of structures, buildings and bridges, with applications to collapse prevention

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Reinhorn is credited with developing computational strategies for the analysis of buildings and bridges using advanced models in nonlinear mechanics with applications to base isolation and fluid or visco-elastic dampers. While the computational strategies were implemented in computer platforms which are used worldwide by select research user groups, the same strategies were used for the implementation and construction of award winning buildings in seismic areas subjected to multiple extreme loadings such as strong winds, earthquakes, and suddenly applied loads. The picture shows the award winning Torre-Mayor Tower in Mexico City, the tallest tower in Latin America, which was equipped with special energy dissipation devices using the computational strategies indicated above. Dr. Reinhorn is currently working on research and development of new theories and associated computational techniques for simulation of collapse of structures, and research on behavior and seismic protection of the integrity of components of electrical power grids. In addition, recent research was also dedicated to quantification of seismic resilience of networks of health care facilities, including transportation and communication networks and organizations governing them. Among other accomplishments are evaluations of super tall buildings using Mixed Lagrangian Formalism (MLF) and integrated optimal design of controlled structures.

Chris S. Renschler

Chris S. Renschler Photo

Associate Professor

Geography

University at Buffalo

116 Wilkeson Quad

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-0480

 

National Center for Geographic Information & Analysis

University at Buffalo

301 Wilkeson Quad

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-2545

 

webpage: http://www.geog.buffalo.edu/~rensch

Research Interests:

Extreme event analysis of earth system processes; Process-based environmental models, GIS & remote sensing; Dev. and implementation of geospatial process-based multi-hazard modeling tools; Decision- and policy-making in natural resources & hazards mgmt

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The formulation of my integrated data transformation and scaling theory contributes to our fundamental understanding and ability to communicate how we (a) represent the spatiotemporal variability, extremes, and uncertainty of environmental properties and processes in the digital domain, how we (b) transform their spatiotemporal representation across scales during data processing and modeling in the digital domain, and how we design and develop tools for (c) geo-spatial data management and (d) geo-spatial process modeling and implement them to effectively (e) support decision- and policy-making in natural resources and hazard management at various spatial and temporal scales of interest.

Scaling theory describing and documenting the transformation of information across scales

Scaling theory describing and documenting the transformation of information across scales

Matthew Ringuette

Matthew Ringuette Photo

Assistant Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

327 Jarvis Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2312

 

webpage: http://www.mae.buffalo.edu/people/full_time/m_ringuette.php

Research Interests:

Experimental fluid mechanics; bio-inspired propulsion for autonomous vehicle design; unsteady vortex dynamics; fluid-structure interactions; shock-wave boundary layer interactions

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

A proposed project is the investigation of bird-like flapping flight at the systems level to design autonomous aircraft for use in disaster mitigation. Applications include tracking the release of airborne toxins and searching for victims in urban environments, which requires maneuverability and long-duration soaring. Also of interest is the unsteady fluid mechanics governing the dynamic loading of buildings subjected to high winds, and the dispersion of scalars such as hazardous aerosols in cities. Another topic is shock waves. The unsteady loading in a Mach 3 shock-wave turbulent boundary layer interaction was investigated using fluctuating wall-pressure measurements during prior post-doctoral work.

A turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate interacting with a shock wave generated by a compression ramp at Mach 3.  Flat plate is at bottom of image; from Ringuette et al. AIAA Journal, 47 2009.

A turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate interacting with a shock wave generated by a compression ramp at Mach 3. Flat plate is at bottom of image; from Ringuette et al. AIAA Journal, 47 2009.

Thomas C. Rosenthal

Thomas C. Rosenthal Photo

Professor and Chair

Family Medicine

Erie County Medical Center

462 Grider Street

Bldg CC Rm 150

Buffalo, NY 14215

716-898-4505

 

Research Interests:

Primary care physician preparation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Rosenthal is a member of the Medical Society of the State of New York’s Task Force on Extreme Events. He has participated in planning and developing training programs for physicians in NY. The programs focus on recognition, early management, reporting and community preparation for extreme events. He has spoken on mental health issues associated with extreme events at national and statewide meetings.

Donald W. Rowe

Donald W. Rowe Photo

Public Health Liaison

Public Health

University at Buffalo

416 Kimball Tower

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3434 ext 414

 

Research Interests:

Public Health collaborations/partnerships; PH emergency preparedness; Cross border public health; PH emergency preparedness curricula development

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Rowe is working with the WNY Public Health Alliance to establish an Advanced Practice Center for Rural Emergency Preparedness. He is developing tools to assist rural communities in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from extreme events. Recent activity includes the conduct of a symposium entitled “Public Health Emergencies and Legal Preparedness: A Cross Border Challenge” held on Nov 17, 2006 via the Baldy Center. Audio and video transcripts will be available soon.

Michael W. Russell

Michael W. Russell Photo

Professor

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

111 Biomedical Research Bldg

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2790

 

Oral Biology

 

webpage: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/wcmpi/faculty/russell.html

Research Interests:

Mucosal immunology; immunity to infection; mucosal vaccines; mucosal adjuvants; oral infections; dental caries; sexually transmitted infections; gonorrhea

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Russell's research in mucosal immunity addresses in particular infections of the oral cavity and the genital tract. However, our novel approaches to the development of mucosally administered vaccines may find application to a variety of infections, especially those that are transmitted by respiratory or oral routes, which are the routes most likely to be involved in extreme events whether of natural or man-made origin. Examples of current concern include avian influenza, food- and water-borne diseases, as well as the unsolved problem of HIV infection. Moreover, mass immunization in the event of emergency would be facilitated by oral or intranasal administration that obviates the problems associated with injected vaccines, i.e., requirements for sterility, disposal of needles, and appropriately trained personnel.

Thomas A. Russo

Thomas A. Russo Photo

Professor

Medicine

University at Buffalo

141 Biomedical Research Bldg.

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2674

 

Research Interests:

Bacterial pathogenesis; Vaccine development; Host-pathogen interactions; Bioinformatics; Neutrophils; Escherichia coli; Acinetobacter baumannii

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Russo has two research focuses: The first involves studies on extraintestinal pathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli (ExPEC), which cause urinary tract infection, pulmonary infection, bacteremia, and other infections outside of the intestinal tract. Dr. Russo’s ExPEC studies focus on: 1) identification of new virulence determinants, 2) ExPEC-host interactions, and 3) vaccine development. Dr. Russo has begun a new COE-based project in collaboration with Drs. Gill and Campagnari. These studies involve Acinteobacter, which is a bacterium that causes nosocomial infections and combat-related infections. Acinetobacter-related studies include: 1) Identification and initial assessment of potential vaccine candidates, 2) Molecular epidemiologic assessment of military and civilian healthcare associated Acinetobacter strain collections, 3) Genome sequencing of representative military and civilian associated A. baumannii strains, and 4) Comparative prevalence of virulence factors, antibiotic resistance genes, and genes that encode surface-exposed epitopes between military and civilian healthcare associated A. baumannii isolates by microarray analysis.

William T. Ruyechan

William T. Ruyechan Photo

Professor and Interim Chair

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

251 Biomedical Research Bldg

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2312

 

webpage: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/wcmpi/faculty/ruyechan.htm

Research Interests:

Virology; Viral pathogenesis; Host virus interactions; Viral vaccines

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Ruyechan's work involves examination of mutations within the varicella zoster virus vaccine that lead to attenuation and which revert to wild type. These molecular tools and approaches can be used to evaluate other viral vaccines and to monitor viral outbreaks resulting from population shifts due to natural and man-made disasters.

Adel W. Sadek

Adel W. Sadek Photo

Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

233 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2421

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:adel-w-sadek/

Research Interests:

Transportation Systems Modeling and Simulation; Intelligent Transportation Systems; Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Computing Applications in Transportation; Traffic Engineering; Infrastructure Management; Transportation Planning

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Microscopic simulation models, especially those that combine routing logic with accurate modeling of traffic flow dynamics, have vast untapped potential for modeling large-scale transportation networks and for achieving the resolution level required for addressing emerging transportation issues such as concerns about emergency preparedness. Microscopic simulation models can also be used to develop effective dynamic routing strategies for a transportation network in case of evacuations and major incidents. Building and calibrating such models, however, is quite challenging and is currently not widely understood. The main intent of this study was therefore to evaluate the feasibility of developing and calibrating a large-scale microscopic simulation for an area of about 1,400 square kilometers, while utilizing primarily readily available information that most Metropolitan Planning Organizations around the country would have access to. The study includes a summary of the main lessons learned and modeling pitfalls to be avoided.

W. James Sarjeant

W. James Sarjeant Photo

James Clerk Maxwell General Dynamics Chair Professor and Director, Energy Systems Institute

Electrical Engineering

University at Buffalo

314A Bonner Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-3115 ext 1208

 

webpage: http://www.esi.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Capacitor development; Insulation coordination; Pulsed power; Power modulation; Partial discharge analysis

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The research focus of the Energy Systems Institute (ESI) is the development of mechanisms to predict failure in electronic systems, while also developing new and novel techniques for protection of electrical systems under extreme conditions. The Institute works with other basic research institutions and with Original Equipment Manufacturers (that make custom electronics to their customer's specifications) and with government laboratories or departments that need to be sure that their product will work when required. ESI’s strategy has been to test and develop systems diagnostics, stage by stage taking developed or developing materials and evaluating them for electrical stress. With the current technological emphasis on electronics size reduction, with increased power density, and high frequency operation, designed/built in diagnostics become even more critical. Our most recent partnerships involve projects working with the military/industrial complex to make the electronics components of a broad spectrum of systems fail-safe for the public at large.

Michael F. Sheridan

Michael F. Sheridan Photo

Director, Center for Geohazards Studies

Geology

University at Buffalo

429A Cooke Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-5345

 

webpage: http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~mfs/ and http://www.geohazards.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Volcanic hazards; Computer simulation of granular flows; Explosive volcanism; Cross disciplinary synergism

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

In October, 2005, tropical storm Stan brought heavy precipitation throughout much of Guatemala. In more mountainous regions, this precipitation induced landslides, debris flows, and mudflows. In the community of Panabaj, Santiago Atitlán, a landslide of loose material originating high on the slopes of Tolimán volcano buried much of the community, leaving approximately 400 people dead. These flows were so forceful that even a thickness of only a few tens of centimeters was enough to completely destroy houses. We have mapped the disaster, made computer simulations of these flows, and advised the civil protection authorities regarding construction of re-location housing for refugees.

Natalie C. Simpson

Natalie C. Simpson Photo

Associate Professor

Management

University at Buffalo

351 Jacobs Management Center

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2443

 

webpage: http://mgt.buffalo.edu/faculty/academic/operations/faculty/nsimpson

Research Interests:

Emergency service systems; Emergency response; Incident command; Event management and business resilience

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Simpson’s work treats emergency response as a unique sector of service management, characterizing the elements of successful operation under highly uncertain conditions. Principles associated with the operation of successful emergency service systems can, in turn, be acquired in some form by many other organizations, to increase resilience against random disruptions of normal operating conditions. Dr. Simpson has both published in the area of emergency response modeling and won national recognition for a teaching case study developed to teach modeling in the context of structural fire-fighting. She has served as a volunteer firefighter since 1997.

Project network diagram of confirmed evacuated residential structure fire hyper-project.  In Simpson, Journal of Operations Management, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2006.

Project network diagram of confirmed evacuated residential structure fire hyper-project. In Simpson, Journal of Operations Management, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2006.

Tarunraj Singh

Tarunraj Singh Photo

Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

1009 Furnas Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2235

 

webpage: http://code.eng.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Optimal control; Nonlinear control; Robust vibration control; Estimation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Accidental or deliberate release of Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) material can result in a toxic plume that is dispersed by wind. Accurate estimate of the dispersion of the toxic material is imperative for timely deployment of first responders and evacuation of populations in the path of the toxic plume. Research related to assimilating sensor data with model forecast for accurate forecasting of plume dispersion is ongoing in conjunction with the development of algorithms for the characterization of sources which can help cap the source of the release. Since the forecasting process is hobbled by inaccuracies in sensor measurements, model errors and errors in estimates of the wind field, a second project related to characterizing and propagating uncertainties through the dynamic system is currently being studied.

Puneet Singla

Puneet Singla Photo

Assistant Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

University at Buffalo

1010 Furnas Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2593 ext 2232

 

webpage: http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~psingla/

Research Interests:

Multi-Resolution Modeling; Uncertainty Propagation; Data Assimilation

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The main focus of Dr. Singla’s research efforts is on developing an analytical and computational framework that enables the construction of multiresolution models from input-output data, characterization and propagation of uncertainty in the mathematical models, and data assimilation of irregularly spaced noisy data to determine optimal and multi-hypothesis estimates of the actual physical phenomenon. The central idea is to replace evolution of initial conditions for a large dynamical system by evolution of probability density functions (pdf) for state variables. A novel feature of this research work is to pose the pdf evolution problem as a convex optimization problem with guaranteed convergence while making use of Kolmogorov equation. Furthermore, Bayesian framework is used to assimilate the noisy observation data with uncertain model forecast to reduce the uncertainty associated with state estimates. Application of interest include: predicting the probability of collision of asteroid with Earth, diffusion of chemical plumes through air, and control of movement and planning of actions of autonomous systems in disaster areas.

Edward Steinfeld

Edward Steinfeld Photo

Professor and Director, IDEA Center

Architecture

University at Buffalo

378 Hayes Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-3485 ext 327

 

webpage: http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/idea

Research Interests:

Emergency evacuation; Disability and aging issues; Standards; Housing

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

People with disabilities are a vulnerable population that are often isolated or ignored during extreme events. Dr. Steinfeld has published a journal article with an overview of this problem. One of the central issues in building design for evacuation is the accommodation of people in wheelchairs. He is the co-director of a major long term study on the anthropometry of wheeled mobility. The results of this work will lead to improvements in building codes, including attention to design of circulation systems, alarm and communications systems that accommodate wheeled mobility users more effectively than present methods. He is also beginning a five-year R&D program that will increase our understanding of how to design transportation systems for people with disabilities and the general public. Emergency transportation concerns will be a part of this new work. Dr. Steinfeld co-directs two national centers of excellence in design for disability and aging, one on universal design of the built environment and the other on accessible public transportation.

Ernest Sternberg

Ernest Sternberg Photo

Professor

Urban and Regional Planning

University at Buffalo

116 Hayes Hall

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2133 ext 224

 

Research Interests:

General conceptualization of disaster planning within a state, urban area, or facility

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Sternberg’s current work asks: How should responsible public officials organize their thinking about the enormously complex issues raised by proneness to disaster? How should they make decisions despite extreme uncertainty and what ethical dilemmas arise under such uncertainty? How can municipalities effectively plan for the systems and capabilities needed in an emergency? His recent published work has focused on planning to avert health emergencies and hospital disasters. Other work has examined urban earthquake recovery and preparedness for severe winter storms. He was project director for the SUNY-wide conference “Scholarship in Homeland Security” held in Albany in Sept. 2005. He is founding president of Protect NY, a group of researchers and educators focused on ways to protect New York State from terrorism, epidemics, and natural or technological disaster (www.protectnewyork.org).

Reported hospital evacuations by hazard type, 1977-1999.  In Sternberg, Lee, and Huard, Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2004.

Reported hospital evacuations by hazard type, 1977-1999. In Sternberg, Lee, and Huard, Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2004.

Moises Sudit

Moises Sudit Photo

Managing Director, Center for Multisource Information Fusion

Industrial and Systems Engineering

University at Buffalo

414 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2357 ext 2473

 

webpage: http://www.infofusion.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Data/Information Fusion; Discrete Optimization; Graph Theory and Network Optimization; Situational Understanding

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Moises Sudit’s primary research interests are in the theory and applications of Discrete Optimization. More specifically, he has been concerned in the design and analysis of methods to solve problems in the areas of Integer Programming and Combinatorial Optimization. One primary goal of this research has been the development of efficient exact and approximate (heuristic) procedures to solve large-scale engineering and management problems. As managing director of the Center for Multisource Information Fusion, Dr. Sudit has merged the interests of Operations Research with Information Fusion.

Robert C. Sugarman

Robert C. Sugarman Photo

Human Factors Coordinator

Industry/University Center for Biosurfaces

RCS Performance Systems, Inc.

4455 Genesee St.

Buffalo, NY 14225

716-634-8016

 

webpage: http://www.rcspsi.com

Research Interests:

Human factors; Ergonomics; Accident reconstuction and analysis; Psychology; Behavioral science; Training

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Sugarman provides analysis and consultation regarding accident causation involving people, their environment, and equipment. He serves on the staff of the I/UCB on the South Campus but is full time at RCS Performance Systems, Inc. developing industrial training programs and providing forensic personal injury analysis. His academic training is in physics and experimental psychology with a concentration in perception. He has experience in construction as a quality manager.

Joseph A. Syracuse

Joseph A. Syracuse Photo

Director, Atlantic OSHA Training Center

Toxicology Research Center

University at Buffalo

Hayes B

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2125

 

webpage: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/CENTERS/trc/

Research Interests:

Occupational safety and health training; Environmental safety and health training; Construction and industrial safety and safety training; Industrial hygiene education; Disaster site safety and worker safety training at extreme event sites

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

At the Atlantic OSHA Training Center and Hazardous Materials Worker Education Program located at the Toxicology Research Center, we have for 16 years provided training to the personnel who respond to the emergencies and disasters resulting from extreme events. We develop and provide training to the emergency responders who work at the incident and to the workers who clean up after the incident. We have developed and conducted training courses to provide healthcare facility personnel the skills needed to deal safely with the casualties who will arrive at our healthcare facilities.

Greg A. Valentine

Greg A. Valentine Photo

Professor

Geology

University at Buffalo

411 Cooke Hall (mail)

777 Natural Sciences Complex (office)

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6800 ext 3983

 

Center for Geohazard Studies

University at Buffalo

429 Cooke Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6366

 

webpage: http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~gav4/home_page.htm

Research Interests:

Volcanic risk; basaltic volcanism; pyroclastic deposits; volcano fluid dynamics & modeling; volcaniclastic & surface processes

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Valentine recently joined UB after 21 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There he led volcanic risk assessment studies for the proposed radioactive waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (southern Nevada), and a multidisciplinary research project focused on linking earth and environmental sciences and urban infrastructure engineering. His current research falls into two main areas: (1) field studies of the processes that control timing, location, and eruptive processes in volcanic fields; and (2) computational studies of the multiphase fluid dynamics associated with large explosive eruptions.

Le Wang

Le Wang Photo

Assistant Professor

Geography

University at Buffalo

110 Wilkeson Quad

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-0474

 

National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis

University at Buffalo

301 Wilkeson Quad

Buffalo, NY 14261

716-645-2545

 

webpage: http://www.buffalo.edu/~lewang and http://www.ncgia.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Dev. of new remote sensing methods; Land cover & use classification & change detection; Coastal mangrove forest characterization; Invasive species spread modeling; Urban population estimates; LiDAR & hyperspectral remote sensing; auto. feature extraction

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Wang is currently conducting two NSF-funded projects: 1) Population Estimation from Remote Sensing: Small-area population estimates are essential for understanding and responding to many social, political, economic, and environmental problems. However, detailed and accurate population and socioeconomic information is only available for one date per decade through the national census. The recent advancements in remote sensing technology coalesced with existing knowledge in the field of applied demography can lead to developing an effective method to project population more accurately in different applications. For example, the launch of IKONOS in 1999 provided new opportunities to investigate urban physical configurations at a fine spatial scale from very high resolution (VHR) optical images. Likewise, the advent of Airborne Light detection and Ranging (LiDAR) sensors for measuring the vertical information has complemented the information provided by optical VHR imagery in many urban studies. The overall objective of this project is to develop detailed and accurate population estimates through integrating the traditional housing unit methods and remote sensing technologies. 2) Characterization of coastal mangroves from remote sensing: Mangroves are a unique forest type that provide critical “ecosystem services”, one of which was recently evidenced in the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, i.e. areas with intact seaward mangrove forests suffered much less human death and property destruction than otherwise. In this research, I intend to map and monitor the spatial distribution, species composition, and health of coastal mangrove forests through linking local, stand-level measurements with remotely sensed patterns of canopy composition and dynamics at the landscape level.

3-D visualization of rasterized LiDAR altimetry data used for building volume estimation (left) and 2000 IKONOS Imagery illustrating three different mangrove species in our study site at Panama (right)

3-D visualization of rasterized LiDAR altimetry data used for building volume estimation (left) and 2000 IKONOS Imagery illustrating three different mangrove species in our study site at Panama (right)

Qian Wang

Qian Wang Photo

Assistant Professor

Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering

University at Buffalo

231 Ketter Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2114 ext 2445

 

webpage: http://www.civil.buffalo.edu/people/interactive-people-search/name:qian-wang/

Research Interests:

Transportation Planning; Travel Demand Forecasting; Freight System Modeling; Congestion Pricing; Behavioral Choice Modeling

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Regarding extreme events, Dr. Wang’s primary research interests are in transportation risk management, emergency logistic systems, and the evacuation planning and modeling. Dr. Wang’s most recent project is to develop methods and procedures for the risk assessment and effective management of transportation systems under multiple hazard situations, including earthquakes, inclement weathers, major accidents, emergency evacuations, and combinations consisting of two or more such hazards. As the first stage of the project, the project team is developing a new evaluation procedure that assesses the impact of earthquakes on both people and goods movements. The associated module will be added to REDARS 2, a public-domain seismic risk analysis software package developed by MCEER. As an extension, the further tasks will focus on broadening the framework to consider different and multiple hazards and place the emphasis not only on risk assessment but also on risk management.

Noreen Williams

Noreen Williams Photo

Professor

Microbiology and Immunology

University at Buffalo

253 Biomedical Research Bldg

Buffalo, NY 14214

716-829-2279

 

webpage: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/wcmpi/Faculty/williams.html

Research Interests:

Molecular parasitology; developmental regulation of gene expression in response to the environment

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The primary focus of Dr. Williams's research is on the parasitic protozoans, Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent for African sleeping sickness and Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent for Chagas disease in Latin America. These parasites have been difficult to target with vaccines. Many of the current chemotherapeutic agents are quite toxic and alternative approaches are needed. She is interested in the developmentally regulated processes that are required for successful transmission of the organism from one host to another [e.g. insect to human]. By understanding these processes, we may also be able to prevent transmission and the completion of the life cycle of the parasite. Critical enzyme complexes, such as the mitochondrial ATP synthase, or key processes, such as ribosomal biogenesis, are excellent targets for such transmission blocks.

Troy D. Wood

Troy D. Wood Photo

Associate Professor

Chemistry

University at Buffalo

417 Natural Sciences Complex

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-6800 ext.2176

 

webpage: http://www.chem.buffalo.edu/wood.php

Research Interests:

Biodefense; Chemical profiling

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The Wood group’s research efforts in Extreme Events are related to detection and classification of bacterial infectious agents using chemical markers that provide a molecular fingerprint of the agent(s) responsible. This characterization uses sensitive mass spectrometric techniques to characterize both volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced from bacterial metabolism, as well as intrinsic "biomarkers" representative of individual bacterial species. As a consequence, our research represents an interdisciplinary collaborative effort with CUBRC and the Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics at the University at Buffalo.

Randy K. Yerrick

Randy K. Yerrick Photo

Professor

Learning and Instruction

University at Buffalo

515 Baldy Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2455 ext 1224

 

webpage: http://gse.buffalo.edu/faculty/viewfaculty.asp?id=113

Research Interests:

K-12 Science Education; Apple Learning Interchange

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Dr. Randy Yerrick is a professor of science educaiton and Associate Dean of Educational Technology for GSE. Dr. Yerrick's life work has been devoted to improving science teaching, especially for children who are underserved by today's schools. He spends much of his time teaching children in k - 12 contexts and coordinates his university courses and school collaborations sharing some of his work and teaching through published exhibits at the Apple Learning Interchange as he uses technologies such as digital video and photography, data acquisition tools, digital microscopes, and data analysis tools in science classes to make science learning more meaningful and engaging for children. More recently Dr. Yerrick has been providing content and direction to the iTunes UB effort for its upcoming launch.

Jun Zhuang

Jun Zhuang Photo

Assistant Professor and Co-Director, Research Institute for Safety & Security in Transportation

Industrial and Systems Engineering

University at Buffalo

403 Bell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-2357 ext 2475

 

webpage: http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~jzhuang/

Research Interests:

Methodology: Game Theory; Operations Research; Decision and Risk Analysis; Stochastic Dynamic Programming Applications: Homeland Security; Computer Network Security; Transportation; Supply Chain Risk Management

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

Traditional risk analysis generally neglects the fact that terrorists are intelligent and adaptive, while most homeland-security games developed so far unrealistically assume that all players are fully strategic. In a recent sponsored project “Homeland-Security Games with Non-strategic Players,” Dr. Zhuang and his research team developed methods and techniques for identifying optimal strategies for rational defenders when facing non-strategic (irrational and/or behaviorally realistic) players, making it possible to explore the sensitivity of optimal defender strategies to assumptions about the behavior of other players. This research makes game-theoretic homeland-security models more realistic and implementable.

Jennifer Zirnheld

Jennifer Zirnheld Photo

Assistant Professor and Deputy Director, Energy Systems Institute

Electrical Engineering

University at Buffalo

313 Bonner Hall

Buffalo, NY 14260

716-645-3115 ext1202

 

webpage: http://www.esi.buffalo.edu

Research Interests:

Dielectric phenomena; Power systems and energy management; Generation and distribution; Multifactor stress aging; Partial discharge analysis; Systems integration

Summary of Recent Relevant Research:

The research focus of the Energy Systems Institute (ESI) is the development of mechanisms to predict failure in electronic systems, while also developing new and novel techniques for protection of electrical systems under extreme conditions. The Institute works with other basic research institutions and with Original Equipment Manufacturers (that make custom electronics to their customer's specifications) and with government laboratories or departments that need to be sure that their product will work when required. ESI’s strategy has been to test and develop systems diagnostics, stage by stage taking developed or developing materials and evaluating them for electrical stress. With the current technological emphasis on electronics size reduction, with increased power density, and high frequency operation, designed/built in diagnostics become even more critical. Our most recent partnerships involve projects working with the military/industrial complex to make the electronics components of a broad spectrum of systems fail-safe for the public at large