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FOURTH NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON BRIDGE RESEARCH IN PROGRESS:
 
RESEARCH ABSTRACT
 
Title:
Research in PROGRESS: on Steel Bridges at University of Washington
Author(s) and Affiliation(s):
Charles W. Roeder and Gregory MacRae Department of Civil Engineering University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Principal Investigator:
Charles W. Roeder and Gregory A. MacRae
Sponsor(s):
Washington State Department of Transportation1 and American Iron and Steel Institute2
Research Start Date:
October 19951 and December 19952
Expected Completion Date:
December 19971 and Spring 19972
Research Objectives:
Two major steel bridge studies are currently underway: (1) Fatigue: This research study will establish the cause of existing fatigue problems in riveted steel bridges, develop estimates of their expected fatigue life, and determine the effect of overload vehicles and future changes in legal load limits on the fatigue life. Analytical and experimental studies will be performed. (2) Thermal: This study will evaluate the thermal movements in steel bridges with composite concrete bridge decks. It will develop recommendations for improved design procedures for establishing design thermal movements and more rational length limits for integral construction with this bridge type.
Expected Products or Deliverables:
(1) Fatigue: Study will provide a better understanding of the fatigue and dynamic response of steel truss and tied arch bridges. Initial estimates of expected fatigue life and an indication of the load spectrum on the critical elements will be developed. (2) Thermal: Study will produce maps which propose design temperatures for thermal movements of steel bridges and rational length limits for integral construction with these same bridge types. Improved strategies for dealing with installation temperature of bridge components, joints and bearings will be proposed.

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