skip navigation

Project Team:


Thomas O'Rourke

Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University

Civil, Structural & Environmental Engineering; University at Buffalo

Civil, Structural & Environmental Engineering; University at Buffalo

Sofia Tangalos

MCEER, University at Buffalo

Harry Stewart

Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University

Timothy Nealon

Graduate Student
(MS 2011);
Civil, Structural & Environmental Engineering;
University at Buffalo

Zilan Zhong

Graduate Student;
Civil, Structural & Environmental Engineering;
University at Buffalo


Sponsors:

NEES

George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation Research (NEESR)
NEESR-CR: Award number 1041498

NSF

National Science Foundation


Project Duration:

2010-2013

Earthquake Response and Rehabilitation of Critical Lifelines

This research will transform the seismic mitigation of lifelines by 1) qualifying in situ lining technology to retrofit existing underground infrastructure, 2) developing fundamental understanding and analytical capabilities for the in-situ reinforcement of lifelines, 3) combining full-scale experimental validation and computational simulation in design and construction guidelines, 4) developing undergraduate classroom projects related to seismic vulnerability and design of lifelines, and 5) delivering short courses for industry and students, with web-based lectures, seminars, and notes. The research will correct a critical deficiency in current practice, namely the lack of verification of in situ pipe lining technologies for seismic retrofitting. It will use flexible electronics for combining micro sensor systems with in situ linings. This fusion of flexible electronics and pipe lining technology has the potential to transform underground utilities into real-time condition monitoring and data collection networks.

The research will be performed through physical modeling at the Cornell Large-Scale Lifelines Testing Facility, University at Buffalo (UB) Dual Shake Table Facility, and California State University at Los Angeles (CSULA) Strength of Materials instructional laboratory, all of which will be used in combination with advanced computational simulation to characterize the behavior of underground lined piping systems. The research involves a university-industry partnership with support from Insituform Technologies, Inc., the largest company worldwide for in situ lining installation, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), and the Center for Advanced Microelectronics Manufacturing (CAMM).

Seismic Testing of Water Pipelines with In situ Linings under Transient Ground Deformation

Seismic Testing of Water Pipelines with In situ Linings under Transient Ground Deformation


Links: